Summary

Australia Victoria Melbourne
Medal - Victorian Juvenile Industrial Exhibition Ararat Commemorative1888 (AD)

Medals were issued in commemoration of the Victorian Juvenile Industrial Exhibition. This example names T. Tobin as Mayor of Ararat. The Shire of Ararat was established in 1864, seven years after gold had been discovered near the site of the future town of Ararat. Ararat's Canton Lead was one of the world's richest shallow alluvial goldfields, and attracted 20,000 prespectors within weeks of its discovery. Its population in the 1850s included a large proportion of Chinese diggers. The Ararat region also became known for the quality of its wool and its wine industry.

The Victorian Juvenile Industrial Exhibition aimed to 'show the advancement of Education in Victoria, and to stimulate a spirit of evaluation amongst the Youth of the colony. The Executive Commissioners intend to devote the surplus funds resulting from the Exhibition for the encouragement of Technical Education in Victoria' (Catalogue of Exhibits, p.5). The Patron of the Exhibition was Sir Henry Brougham Lock, Governor of Victoria. The Exhibition opened in Melbourne on 28 March 1888, and remained open for four months. 'Young people' aged 21 or under were invited to contribute models, working or otherwise, in any material, not to exceed one cubic yard of content. A special category allowed people over the age of 21 to also enter. Exhibitors were permitted to sell their exhibitions, and were not charged for the space unless they were over the age of 21. A broad range of exhibits included processed foods, stuffed animals, photographs, men's and boys' clothing, needlework, tinware, ironwork, architectural models, furniture, buggies and other vehicles, agricultural implements, drawings and carvings. Competitions were also held, in writing, reading, spelling, arithetic, elocution, music, singing, cooking, etc. Age ranges were specified for entrants - for example, the arithmetic competition was divided into boys under 15, girls under 15, and under 12 and under 10 categories. Exhibits included the works of school children and apprentices. Awards consisted of gold, silver and bronze medals, and Certificates of Honorable Mention. A certificate also accompanied each medal.

Physical Description

A gilt bronze medal commemorating the Victorian Juvenile Industrial Exhibition Commemorative held in Melbourne in 1888. It features a crowned and veiled bust of an elderly Queen Victoria and the the Shield of Ararat ( a dove bearing a branch towards an Arc with the sun radiate in the background) within a broad border.

Obverse Description

At centre within a broad rim, bust of Queen Victoria wearing small crown and veil, facing left; around on broad rim, THE VICTORIAN JUVENILE INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION *

Reverse Description

Shield of Ararat ( a dove bearing a branch towards an Arc with the sun radiate in the background) within a broad border on which, T. TOBIN MAYOR + ARARAT +

Edge Description

Plain

Significance

The Exhibition aimed to 'show the advancement of Education in Victoria, and to stimulate a spirit of evaluation amongst the Youth of the colony. The Executive Commissioners intend to devote the surplus funds resulting from the Exhibition for the encouragement of Technical Education in Victoria' (Catalogue of Exhibits, p.5). The Patron of the Exhibition was Sir Henry Brougham Lock, Governor of Victoria. The Exhibition opened in Melbourne on 28 March 1888, and remained open for four months. 'Young people' aged 21 or under were invited to contribute models, working or otherwise, in any material, not to exceed one cubic yard of content. A special category allowed people over the age of 21 to also enter. Exhibitors were permitted to sell their exhibitions, and were not charged for the space unless they were over the age of 21. A broad range of exhibits included processed foods, stuffed animals, photographs, men's and boys' clothing, needlework, tinware, ironwork, architectural models, furniture, buggies and other vehicles, agricultural implements, drawings and carvings. Competitions were also held, in writing, reading, spelling, arithetic, elocution, music, singing, cooking, etc. Age ranges were specified for entrants - for example, the arithmetic competition was divided into boys under 15, girls under 15, and under 12 and under 10 categories. Exhibits included the works of school children and apprentices. Awards consisted of gold, silver and bronze medals, and Certificates of Honorable Mention. A certificate also accompanied each medal. -Official Catalogue: Victorial Juvenile Industrial Exhibition, Melbourne, 1888. -D. Tout-Smith 20/11/2003.

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